Quote of the moment

"I have to tell it again and again: I have no doctrine. I only point out something. I point out reality, I point out something in reality which has not or too little been seen. I take him who listens to me at his hand and lead him to the window. I push open the window and point outside. I have no doctrine, I carry on a dialogue." Martin Buber

Thursday, June 30, 2011

Unanswered Questions for the Gallup Poll on Community Inclusion for People with Intellectual Disabilities

Yesterday I posted the results of the Gallup Poll   that concluded:  Europeans Most Open to Those With Intellectual Disabilities.

Many questions remain unanswered regarding the population characteristics of sample populations. Specifically for the Chilean population, just how representative was the sample of 1007 Chileans north to south (bringing to mind Santiago no es Chile).  To learn more about the study I requested the data set of Gallup and hope to look at this a little more closely. Hopefully more will do so as well:
For complete data sets or custom research from the more than 150 countries Gallup continually surveys, please contact SocialandEconomicAnalysis@gallup.com or call 202.715.3030.

Unfortunately what this poll demonstrates,  no matter the country you are in there will still be much required of people with disabilities in order to get to the same place as their fellow-citizens. Of greater interest is how the individuals with disabilities actually feel, what do they want as a citizen (presuming the country perceives them as such and does not discriminate or disenfranchise them from membership of their country and community. It would be interesting to know if they were even considered as part of the sampling population...and if not why not.

Stay tuned!




UN URGES EUROPE AND CENTRAL ASIA TO STOP SENDING CHILDREN TO STATE-RUN HOMES

New York, Jun 29 2011  5:05PM
Two United Nations entities have urged governments in Europe and Central Asia to immediately end the practice of placing young children in State-run homes for infants because of the risk of neglect and abuse.

The UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) yesterday http://www.unicef.org/media/media_59030.html launched a campaign against sending children to State-managed homes after two new reports documented abuses of children in such institutions.

The reports showed that across Europe and Central Asia, including in States that are members of the European Union (EU), more than a million children and adults are living in long-term residential care, where they languish, often for a lifetime.

Hundreds of thousands of babies with disabilities are routinely placed in State-run homes, severely hampering their development, with many suffering in appalling conditions, according to the reports.

The report by OHCHR, entitled Forgotten Europeans – Forgotten Rights, outlines international and European human rights standards relevant to the situation of people in institutions.

The UNICEF document, entitled At Home or in a Home – Formal care and adoption of children in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, provides an overview of the major trends and concerns about children in formal care and institutions, as well as adoption in 21 countries and one entity in Central and Eastern Europe and Central Asia.

At a meeting in the European Parliament hosted by Irish legislator Mairead McGuinness, the two UN entities urged governments across the region to make the needs and rights of the youngest children a priority in policy-making, budget allocation and services development, while following international and European standards.

The call to action includes restricting placement of children in institutions to short-term emergency measures or a planned stay not exceeding six months – and only when it is absolutely necessary and in the best interests of the child.

“Children belong where their best interests are met – in loving, caring homes, not in institutions where we know they all too often receive substandard care,” said Anthony Lake, the UNICEF Executive Director.

“We need to support initiatives that help families stay together by increasing their access to social services – and governments need to invest in building stronger social  protection systems that reach the most vulnerable families and most disadvantaged communities.”

Jan Jarab, OHCHR’s regional representative for Europe, said: “Many Central and Eastern European countries have largely maintained the system of large-scale residential institutions for children of all ages.

“Placement of children into institutions – including those under three years of age – is still the society’s main response to disability, poverty or perceived lack of parental skills, rather than a measure of protection from individual abuse, from which these societies often fail to protect children.”
________________
For more details go to UN News Centre at http://www.un.org/newsvar

OHCHR Report 2010 : Compiled References to People with Disabilities

Tchaurea Fleury, IDA Secretariat, announced the High Commissioner for Human Rights has recently published her annual Report 2010, which will be presented tomorrow, 1 July, in Palais des Nations.

 The online version of the Report is available at:
www2.ohchr.org/english/ohchrreport2010/web_version/ohchr_report2010_web/index.html#/home


Due to the inaccessibility of the pdf format online, the IDA Secretariat has compiled all references to persons with disabilities, disability rights and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, and some related issues. Please see the compilation below.

The OHCHR Report 2010 gave a significant place to persons with disabilities in Chapter 3 - Thematic Priorities, Discrimination section, which presents examples of OHCHR's good practices on the rights of persons with disabilities. Furthermore, the Report includes references to some specific groups such as the albino community, persons affected by leprosy and people living with HIV or AIDS. The Report presents also many references to the participation of organizations of persons with disabilities.

Within the compilation, you may note that the "Disability requirements for 2010-2011" represents 2.5% of OHCHR's main Programs budget.

To finish, the compilation presents the OHCHR's expected accomplishments and outputs for 2010-2011, which have no specific references to persons with disabilities or their rights, but some related matters, for example, to increase the participation of right-holders, specially discriminated groups, in decision-making processes (EA5) or the OHCHR website should meet the needs of users (GM07). 




OHCHR Report 2010
Chapter 1 - Foreword by the High Commissioner
Note: There is no mention of persons with disabilities in this section. 

Chapter 2 - About OHCHR
Note: There is no mention of persons with disabilities in this section. 

Chapter 3 - Thematic Priorities

I. Discrimination
The opening photo shows a girl with disability waiting to be fitted with a prosthetic leg in Haiti. The enouncing says: "OHCHR advocates for the end of discrimination against persons with disabilities."

4. Persons with disabilities
The rights of persons with disabilities have long been unrecognized or denied. OHCHR has significantly increased its work on the rights of persons with disabilities since the adoption of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). In addition to supporting the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and technical cooperation and research undertaken at headquarters, over 20 human rights field presences currently promote the rights of persons with disabilities, including by focusing on law and policy reform.

For example, in Cameroon, with support of the Regional Office for Central Africa, a national law to protect the rights of persons with disabilities was adopted in April 2010; ratification of the CRPD is expected. Similarly, in Sierra Leone, a disability bill was tabled in Parliament and consensus was reached. The Human Rights Component of the UN Integrated Peace-Building Mission in Sierra Leone (UNIPSIL) provided technical support to civil society organizations during consultations and advocated for the enactment of the bill, which is currently at the legislative committee for final review.

The Uganda Office supported incorporating the CRPD into domestic law through training Government and civil society partners and advocacy. The Colombia Office has, in addition to advocating for ratification, begun preparation of a study on the institutional and normative modifications required on the CRPD’s entry into force at the national level.

The Human Rights Adviser in Albania worked with UNDP to set up a programme to support the Government and civil society in the process of law reform and institution-building necessary for ratification of the CRPD. The Human Rights Adviser in the South Caucasus, together with UNICEF, supported the Ministry of Education and Science in its work to encourage amendment of the Law on General Education in order to harmonize it with the CRPD. The Cambodia Office has supported law reform in Cambodia to ensure consistency with the CRPD. The Human Rights Adviser in Papua New
Guinea supported the adoption of a National Disability Policy. The Regional Office for South-East
Asia has worked with the UN Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific on harmonizing national legislation in 10 countries with the CRPD.

- Ratification
On 23 December the European Union ratified the CRPD, thus becoming the first regional organization to ratify a UN human rights treaty. The CRPD was also ratified by Armenia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Canada, Ethiopia, France, Latvia, Lithuania, Malaysia, Maldives, Mauritius, Nepal, Nigeria, Republic of Moldova, Sierra Leone, Slovakia, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates and Zambia. St Vincent and the Grenadines acceded to the Convention, while Bhutan and Grenada signed.  In most of these cases, OHCHR advocated for ratification through targeted actions and provided critical legal advice.

The Optional Protocol to the CRPD was ratified by Honduras, Nicaragua, Turkmenistan and St. Vincent and the Grenadines.

- Justice and accountability mechanisms
EA3 - Increased number of justice and accountability mechanisms established and functioning in accordance with international human rights standards to monitor, investigate and redress civil, cultural, economic, political and social human rights violations related to discrimination

In Tanzania, the Commission for Human Rights and Good Governance was able to conduct investigations into human rights violations, including those committed against the albino community.

Around 50 countries impose some form of restriction on entry, stay or residence based on people’s HIV status alone. Such laws are discriminatory, contrary to sound public health principles and hamper universal access to HIV prevention, treatment, care and support. OHCHR, together with other parts of the United Nations, have called for the repeal of such laws as they disproportionately affect the enjoyment of human rights by people living with HIV. Such efforts have led to the repeal of these restrictions in some countries including China, Namibia and the United States.

- Access to justice and basic services
EA4 - Increased number of measures taken to improve access to justice and basic services of those affected by discrimination, particularly women, and with regards to the right to education

Note: There is no specific mention of persons with disabilities in this section.  However, there are some related issues:

The Office works with stakeholders to develop non-discrimination indicators. From 3-5 May 2010,
United Nations experts, academia, human rights institutions, national statistical institutions, representatives of Governments from Latin America and the Caribbean and indigenous peoples and
African-descendant communities met in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, to discuss data collection and the use of indicators to promote and monitor racial equality and non-discrimination in the region.

Persons most affected by social exclusion need particular support in order to access justice and basic services. The Human Rights Adviser in Rwanda provided technical assistance to legal aid clinics through the Ministry of Justice. These clinics provide legal advice to the population at community level, especially children and vulnerable women. In Mexico, the National Institute for Indigenous
Languages officially launched a national roster of interpreters of indigenous languages. The roster, which will be accessible to judges and other justice system officials, was created to fight discrimination against indigenous people in the justice system.

In Guatemala, the Office helped empower civil society organizations to use strategic litigation by providing training and tools to Guatemalan NGOs working on the defence of indigenous peoples’ rights. The first 12 NGOs with which OHCHR interacted have already filed complaints relating to 12 cases. Specialized training to legal staff in the Presidential Commission on Discrimination and
Racism against Indigenous People and the Office for the Defence of Indigenous Women has contributed to the strengthening of the capacities of these institutions regarding the investigation and prosecution of cases related to discrimination against indigenous peoples and women.

Participation
EA5 - Increase in use by individuals facing discrimination of existing national protection systems and their meaningful participation in decision-making processes and monitoring of public policies

Participation in elections and decision-making processes is essential for the exercise of human rights.  In Cameroon, as a result of advocacy and lobbying by Sightsavers and the Office, there was a significant focus on facilitating the participation of persons with disabilities in the 2011 presidential elections.

Engagement with human rights mechanisms
EA7 - Increased number of victims of discrimination, and national human rights institutions acting on their behalf, using the Human Rights Council and its subsidiary bodies, special procedures and treaty bodies to promote equality and non-discrimination

In Serbia, a working group, including more than 10 organizations of persons with disabilities, on the drafting of the initial report on the implementation of the CRPD was established.

Responsiveness of the international community
EA10 - International community, increasingly responsive to situations characterized by discrimination against individuals and groups

Note: There is no reference to persons with disabilities in this section.  However, there are some related issues:

One of the most significant thematic studies produced by the Office in 2010 focused on the issue of maternal mortality and morbidity. The study prompted a joint statement by 108 countries in the Human Rights Council requesting the High Commissioner to present it to the Millennium Development Goals Review Summit in September. The Council subsequently requested OHCHR to prepare a second report on good and effective practices to prevent maternal mortality and morbidity for September 2011. This request was supported by 96 co-sponsors, indicating that the international community is increasingly responsive to this issue.

The Office also deals with forms of discrimination that are not explicitly addressed by existing international human rights instruments, such as age-related discrimination and the human rights of older persons. In December 2010, the General Assembly established an Open-ended Working Group relating to the rights of older persons for the purpose of strengthening their human rights.

The principles and guidelines on the elimination of discrimination against persons affected by leprosy and their family members offer specific guidance on this form of health-related discrimination and stigma. These principles were adopted by the HRC in September and a resolution was passed by the GA on the same subject in December. OHCHR contributed by providing substantive support to the work of the Advisory Committee of the HRC throughout the drafting process.

Human rights mainstreaming within the United Nations
EA11 - Increased integration of equality and non-discrimination standards and principles into
UN policies and programmes with respect to development, humanitarian action, peace and security, and economic and social issues

Note: There is no specific mention of persons with disabilities in this section.  However, there are some related issues:

OHCHR works with a broad range of UN partners to address human rights concerns. The Human Rights Adviser in Albania worked with UN partners to promote a continued focus on a human rights-based approach. The One UN common country programming document, to be adopted in 2011, is expected to be largely rights-based, much as a result of the Adviser’s contribution to the drafting process.

In Mauritania, anti-discrimination and women’s rights have been made priorities for the UNDAF period 2010-2015 and have been incorporated in UNDAF programmes. In Rwanda, a joint Gender and Human Rights Mainstreaming checklist for the UNDAF thematic groups was developed by the Gender Task Force and the Human Rights Task Force.

Finally, OHCHR promotes non-discrimination in inter-agency discussions so that there is a cohesive approach and a stronger response. For example, the Office co-chairs, with UN Women, the UN Evaluation Group (UNEG) Task Force on integrating gender equality issues and the human rights dimension in all UN evaluations.  The Task Force has prepared a UNEG handbook, to be released during 2011, on the integration of human rights and gender issues into all UN evaluations.

The UNDP launched Marginalised Minorities in Development Programming: A UNDP Resource Guide and Toolkit on 26 May 2010. This publication is the result of a comprehensive consultative and drafting process, initiated by the Independent Expert on minority issues and led by a task force composed of leading policy advisers from all UNDP practice areas, regional bureaus, Regional Service Centres, country office practitioners, the Independent Expert and OHCHR staff.

II. Impunity and the rule of law
Combating impunity and strengthening accountability, the rule of law and democratic society

Note: There is no specific mention of persons with disabilities in this section.  However, there are some related issues:

OHCHR’s role
OHCHR engages in dialogue with States on the best ways to achieve legal protection of human rights and accountability for violations. At the country level, efforts focus on dialogue with governments, institutions concerned with the administration of justice, law enforcement agencies, national human rights institutions (NHRIs) and civil society organizations to promote principles of accountability and the rule of law, to share examples of best practice and to provide technical advice.

National laws, policies and institutions
EA1 – Increased number of democratic institutions engaged in issues related to combating impunity
On matters of rule of law and constitution-making, OHCHR continues to advocate for strengthened legislation and provisions with regard to human rights.

Recognizing that data, its collection and compilation are essential in the quest to realize human rights, OHCHR has developed a framework which promotes a common approach to the identification of indicators for the monitoring of civil, cultural, economic, political and social rights. This framework makes precise and up-to-date data available, thereby assisting States to assess progress in human rights implementation and capacity-building.

III. Poverty and economic, social and cultural rights
Pursuing economic, social and cultural rights and combating inequalities and poverty, including in the context of the economic, food and climate crises

Note: There is no specific mention of persons with disabilities in this section.  However, there are some related issues:

OHCHR’s role
OHCHR also leads UN-wide efforts to mainstream human rights. This means integrating all human rights into national development and international cooperation efforts, including those aimed at achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The human rights-based approach to development is one of the five key programming principles for UN country teams and the Office lends support in carrying this out. The following are results the Office helped bring about in 2010.

- National laws, policies and institutions
EA1 - Increased compliance with international human rights standards by relevant State institutions in domestic laws, policies and programmes relevant to development, poverty reduction and economic, social and cultural rights

In Mexico, indicators on the right to health were elaborated by the National Statistical Institute and the National Human Rights Commission. The Guatemalan National Statistics Office, with the support of OHCHR-Guatemala, promoted the incorporation of a gender and a multicultural perspective into their data collection processes in different ministries. In Ecuador, the pilot phase of a project to establish a national human rights indicators’ system was launched. The project focused on the right to integrity and the right to work and involved cooperation between different Government agencies and civil society actors. Also in Ecuador, with the help of the Human Rights Adviser and two specialists funded by the Office, steps began to develop a methodology for mainstreaming human rights into national development planning processes.

In November 2009, the Committee against Torture (CAT) issued recommendations for the Republic of Moldova to amend the legal basis for the coercive treatment of persons with tuberculosis. In March 2010, the Ministry of Health, in collaboration with the UN Resident Coordinator, established a Human Rights and Health Working Group to examine policy, law and practice in four key health areas, namely HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, sexual and reproductive health, and mental health. The Working Group succeeded in altering views about the need for human rights change in the health care system.

In Liberia, the final draft of the National Health Promotion Policy Working Group has been validated, with the support of the Human Rights and Protection Section (HRPS); it seeks to ensure that health promotion interventions will be guided by a human rights-based approach.

By distributing learning materials and tools tailored to the national context, OHCHR helps to strengthen the capacity of human rights NGOs and the media to monitor, assess and report on the impact of national laws, policies and programmes on ESCRs and on poverty reduction and inequalities. For example, training modules on the basic concepts and monitoring of ESCRs were produced, as well as a chapter on these issues for inclusion in the OHCHR Monitoring Manual, and a training package on human rights-based approach in budget monitoring and advocacy.

- Access to justice and basic services
EA4 – Increased number of measures taken to improve access to justice and to quality economic and social services by discriminated groups, and particularly women, indigenous and minority groups, and people living in poverty
The Office undertakes capacity-building activities with administrative authorities, NHRIs, NGOs and legal clinics to raise awareness about ESCRs and the options available for obtaining redress in cases of violations, with a special focus on marginalized groups and those most affected by discrimination.

Participation
EA5 - Discriminated groups, and particularly women, indigenous and minority groups, and people living in poverty, increasingly advocate for their economic, social and cultural rights and participate in decision-making processes and the formulation and monitoring of relevant public policies

Human rights defenders in Serbia worked for the protection of ESCRs, with some engaged in issues related to workers’ rights, the right to adequate housing, the right to education, and the right to health, amongst other issues. This contrasts with the situation only a few years ago when human rights defenders focused exclusively on civil and political rights. Awareness by local actors on the need to strengthen access to justice on ESCRs was increased, particularly in Africa and Latin America, through the delivery of targeted training on the justiciability and domestic application of ESCRs.


Chapter 4 - Management and Funding

I. Global Management Outputs – Summary of Results 2010

3. Increased effectiveness of OHCHR’s lead role in partnerships for human rights mainstreaming
Progress made in mainstreaming human rights in UN-wide programmes through the Global Migration Group, the Inter-Agency Support Group (IASG) on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), the Secretary-General’s High-Level Task Force on Global Food Security, the Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC), the Global Protection Cluster Working Group and joint events with WTO, UNITAR and civil society.

5. Increased effectiveness and efficiency in supporting field operations
Key inputs and thematic expertise provided to OHCHR staff in the field, including on economic, social and cultural rights, transitional justice and witness protection, human rights monitoring and investigation, human rights education programmes, formulation of national human rights action plans and work on disability for more targeted interventions with local stakeholders.

II. OHCHR's Programmes
Subprogramme 1 - Human Rights Mainstreaming, Right to Development, Research and Analysis (RRDD)
Revised requirements 2010-2011 - 26,408.7
Income 2010 - 12,344.1
Expenditure 2010 - 13,062.0
Projected requirements 2011 - 13,346.7

Disability requirements 2010-2011 - 662.0
Disability Income 2010 - 356.8
Disability Expenditure 2010 - 341.5
Disability Projected requirements 2011 - 320.5
Chapter 5 - OHCHR in the Field: Introduction

I. AFRICA
- Uganda - OHCHR-Uganda supported a human rights perspective in the discussions on the domestication of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) and the HIV/AIDS bill through partner training and strategic consultations.

The Office printed the concluding observations currently being disseminated by the Government and civil society. OHCHR-Uganda also held sessions with the same actors to help in the presentation of their draft reports to the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

Women and girls face different types of violations, predominantly high rates of sexual and gender-based violence accompanied by low prosecution rates and onerous court procedures. OHCHR designed, together with UNFPA, UNICEF and UNDP, a joint program under the Peacebuilding Fund for Northern Uganda (Acholi) to address these issues with key duty-bearers. The plan will be implemented during 2011 and 2012. Other vulnerable groups like persons with disabilities, persons living with HIV/AIDS, LGBTs and especially vulnerable individuals among the IDP population, are still facing challenges in enjoying human rights on an equal basis with other sectors of the population.

- Regional Offices and Centres
In Cameroon, a national law to protect the rights of persons with disabilities was adopted in April 2010. The Law was largely in conformity with the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). Following the Centre's advocacy efforts, ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) in Cameroon, the Republic of the Congo and Equatorial Guinea should follow shortly.
The Centre’s continuing joint advocacy efforts with Sightsavers and the Cameroon NHRI have led to Cameroon’s election management body, ELECAM, starting to take concrete accessibility measures to allow persons with disabilities to vote freely, independently and in dignity in the forthcoming 2011 elections.

- Regional Office for East Africa (Addis Ababa, Ethiopia)
Dialogue was initiated with Ethiopia on the development of a national plan of action on human rights, and during 2010 Ethiopia took a number of steps to implement UPR recommendations, including ratifying the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) and signing the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child (OP-CRC).

- Liberia
In the context of developing Liberia’s NHRAP, the Section provided technical support for three major data collection and analysis initiatives in 2010: the Core Welfare Indicators Questionnaire, the National Labour Force Survey, and the National Human Rights Survey, which sets a baseline for NHRAP monitoring and has a specific focus on gender issues and women’s rights. The Section also provided technical support to the Disabilities Task Force and helped in the production of an Issues Paper on People with Disabilities, also intended to feed into the NHRAP and all Government planning and implementation. There is a clear link between the UPR recommendations and the NHRAP.

- Sierra Leone
A human rights-compliant disability bill was tabled in Parliament and the House reached a consensus on it. The Bill is currently at the legislative committee for final perusal. The HRS gave technical support to civil society organisations (CSOs) during consultations and advocated for the enactment of the Bill. It also organized jointly with the Human Rights Commission a national consultative conference with high-level participation and hosted a pre-legislative discussion on the Persons with Disability Bill for members of the Legislative and Human Rights Parliamentary Committees.

II. AMERICAS
- Mexico
Civil society engagement with human rights mechanisms (EA7)
 A shadow report to the Human Rights Committee was submitted by civil society organizations in 2010. The Office has cooperated with organizations working on the rights of persons with disabilities to elaborate a single shadow report to the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), with submission envisioned for 2011. Furthermore, work to empower civil society to produce an alternative report for the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) is ongoing.

Ratification (EA2)
Venezuela started the process for the ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CPRD).
The Government of Ecuador ratified the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) and its Optional Protocol, the Optional Protocol to the International Convention on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (OP-ICESCR), and the International Convention for the Protection of All Persons against Enforced Disappearance (ICPPED).
Nicaragua ratified the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (OP-CRPD).

III. ASIA AND THE PACIFIC
Important fieldwork was undertaken on protection of civilians in Afghanistan, land issues and prison reform in Cambodia, discrimination and transitional justice issues in Nepal, and education and disability in Timor-Leste.

- Timor-Leste
Human rights mainstreaming within the United Nations (EA11)
Under the co-leadership of the HRTJS, the Protection Cluster established a mechanism to coordinate activities during disaster response at national level for the protection of vulnerable groups, in particular women and persons with disabilities.

Ratification (EA2)
The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) was ratified by the Nepalese Government in May, with the support of promotional activities conducted by the Office.

IV. EUROPE AND CENTRAL ASIA
- Turkmenistan
Turkmenistan ratified the Optional Protocol to the Convention on Rights of Persons with Disabilities
(OP-ICCPR) in November 2010, following consultations and awareness-raising sessions undertaken by OHCHR through the EU/UNDP/OHCHR project

- Regional Office for Europe
The key human rights challenges for European States – both inside and outside the EU – include the rights of migrants; discrimination against ethnic minorities; accessibility for people with disabilities; protection for victims of trafficking; violence against women; substandard conditions in places of detention and care centres; weaknesses in the administration of justice; and unsatisfactory child protection systems.
Particularly relevant has been the increasing engagement with the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights and also with the Council of Europe on thematic areas of shared interest and concern including the situation of migrants; the situation of Roma; the rights of the child; violence against women and persons with disabilities.

For the first time, the annual meeting of treaty body chairpersons was held in Brussels, hosted by the Regional Office. The meeting helped to improve the knowledge of Brussels-based institutions and organizations on the mandate and work of the treaty bodies, and provided a forum for discussions with the EU and the European Court for Human Rights. Following this initiative, two chairpersons were invited to participate in high-level meetings and conferences on EU policies, while the Regional Office was repeatedly contacted by technical units in the EC and the EP to provide relevant concluding observations and general comments in a number of thematic areas. These areas included procedural rights, VAW, the rights of the child, the rights of persons with disabilities, and trafficking.

Ratification (EA2)
On 23 December 2010, the EU ratified the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), becoming the first intergovernmental organization ever to join a UN human rights treaty.

Note: There is a short profile of Gábor Gambos as CRPD Committee member.

- Albania
The adoption of a comprehensive Law on Protection from Discrimination in 2010 and the appointment of the Anti-Discrimination Commissioner were significant positive steps. However, ending discrimination against women, Roma, Egyptians, persons with disabilities, persons of different sexual orientation and other groups requires the implementation of the Law.

Ratification (EA2)
Significant steps were taken to encourage the Government to ratify the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its Optional Protocol. The HRA assisted UNDP in establishing a programme to support ratification, focusing on law and institutional reforms and improving the accessibility of Government buildings. The HRA also worked on improving the knowledge and advocacy capacity of civil society on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD).

- Moldova
The Government of Moldova ratified the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) on 21 September 2010. This came about following numerous consultations between the Government and the UN Resident Coordinator’s office, the HRA, UNICEF, UNDP, the International Labour Organization (ILO) and UNFPA. The HRA drafted various expert memoranda to answer substantive issues raised by Government interlocutors during this process. The HRA’s inputs to the Government, civil society, the NHRI and UNCT also helped to bring into focus key thematic issues for treaty implementation.

Participation (EA5)
Civil society organizations, such as women’s rights groups, LGBT organizations, Roma communities and disabilities organizations, incorporated a human rights perspective into their advocacy. The HRA provided guidance and technical advice to this end.
With the assistance of the HRA, the Centre for Human Rights filed a number of petitions with the Constitutional Court on discrimination against vulnerable people.

- Russian Federation

Ratification (EA2)
The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) was signed in September 2008. In line with this, a Presidential Commission for the Promotion of the Rights of the Disabled was created in December and the Convention’s ratification is expected for 2011. OHCHR, represented by the HRA, is part of the Group of Friends of the Convention led by the UN Information Center and composed of representatives from civil society, academia, business and governmental agencies. The HRA provides technical guidance and training on an ad hoc basis, predominantly to disability rights groups and to the Group of Friends.

- Serbia
State engagement with human rights mechanisms (EA6)
Serbia has fulfilled its reporting obligations to the UN treaty bodies and has recently submitted reports to the following: CAT, ICCPR, CERD, CRC (OP 1 and 2) and CEDAW. Furthermore, a working group for drafting the initial report on the implementation of ICRPD was established, with the inclusion of more than 10 organizations of persons with disabilities.

South Caucasus (based in Tbilisi, covering Georgia, Azerbaijan and Armenia)
In 2010, the Parliament of Georgia amended the Law on General Education, harmonising it with the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (ICRPD) in accordance with the recommendations previously developed through cooperation between the Ministry of Education and Science and experts hired by OHCHR and UNICEF.

Ratification (EA2)
In Georgia, cooperation on issues relating to the rights of persons with disabilities increased between State actors and civil society, resulting in the better planning of governmental activities in the run up to the 2011 ratification of the ICRPD. Awareness and knowledge on the provisions of the ICRPD as well as mechanisms for its implementation have been strengthened among the relevant ministries and civil society actors through cooperation and training activities conducted by the HRA in 2010.

- Tajikistan
The economy of the country is heavily dependent on remittances from its migrant workers, which have decreased substantially in the last couple of years due to the world economic crisis. This has negatively affected the population, particularly vulnerable groups such as the elderly, children, persons with disabilities, minority groups, single-headed households and those living below the poverty line. The HRA works to improve awareness on economic, social, civil and political rights, and assist dialogue between rights-holders and duty-bearers to help facilitate the integration of international human rights standards into the country’s legislative framework.

A plan of action for the ratification and implementation of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) was outlined in a workshop for Government officials and organizations of persons with disabilities. The Government did not ratify the CRPD, despite the formal commitment to do so in early 2010. The United Nations and the HRA continued advocacy work to encourage the Government to ratify the Convention. This resulted in the authorities agreeing to an all-stakeholder meeting to explain their position in early 2011.

V. MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA

Note: There is no reference to persons with disabilities or their rights.
Chapter 6 - HEADQUARTERS

I. Executive Direction and Management
I. Civil Society Section
The Section produced OHCHR’s first publication in a format designed for persons with visual or print disability. This version of OHCHR’s most popular publication, Working with the United
Nations Human Rights Programme: a Handbook for Civil Society, provides relevant software to access synchronized audio and visual text with easy navigability, in addition to software for
Braille users. The CD-Rom was piloted, before its finalization, by expert members of the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD).

II. Programme Support and Management Services
PSMS continues to adapt to a changing United Nations context and whenever possible strives to do so proactively. Sustainable management (Greening the UN), accessibility for people with disabilities, organizational effectiveness and administrative reform are the principles and challenges that lie behind the work that PSMS undertakes.

II. Research and Right to Development Division
The issuance of a UN Guidance Note for UN Country Teams on integrating the rights of persons with disabilities in country programming is proof of the increased mainstreaming of human rights in this area. This result was achieved in collaboration with the Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA) and ILO.

OHCHR’s chairpersonship of the Global Migration Group; joint events with the World Trade Organization (WTO), UNITAR and civil society on trade and human rights; co-chairing of the Inter-Agency Support Group (IASG) on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD); participation in the Secretary-General’s High-Level Task Force on Global Food Security; joint training programmes with UNITAR for diplomats; and participation in the IASC and the Global Protection Cluster Working Group resulted in additional progress made in mainstreaming human rights in UN-wide programmes.

Supporting field operations (GMO5)
The Division contributed to increased effectiveness in the field by providing key inputs and thematic expertise to OHCHR staff in a number of areas, including on ESCR, transitional justice and witness protection, human rights monitoring and investigation, human rights education programmes, the formulation of national human rights action plans and work on disability.

III. Human Rights Treaties Division
In 2010, OHCHR supported the work of eight treaty bodies mandated to monitor implementation related to core international human rights treaties (and two Optional Protocols to the Convention on the Rights of the Child) and one treaty body mandated to carry out country visits under the Optional Protocol to the Convention against Torture (OPCAT). The nine treaty bodies serviced in 2010 comprised:

The Human Rights Committee (HRCommittee)
The Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (CESCR)
The Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD)
The Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW)
The Committee against Torture (CAT)
The Subcommittee on Prevention of Torture (SPT)
The Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC)
The Committee on Migrant Workers (CMW)
The Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)

IV. Field Operations and Technical Cooperation Division

Ratification (EA2)
Advocated, through targeted actions like the organization of regional seminars, for the ratification of the following conventions: the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), in Malaysia, Maldives, St. Vincent and the Grenadines; the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families (ICRMW), in St. Vincent and the Grenadines; the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) in Pakistan; and the Convention against Torture (CAT) in Pakistan.

UPR: Country-level Results
France (examined in 2008)
Ratified the International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance (ICCPED), the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (ICRPD) and its Optional Protocol, and the Optional Protocol to the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (OPCAT).

V. Human Rights Council and Special Procedures Division

13th Session (1-26 March)
The Council adopted resolutions and decisions on:
A number of thematic human rights challenges, including arbitrary deprivation of nationality, rights of persons with disabilities, protection of human rights defenders, torture, rights of the child, protection of journalists in armed conflicts, combating defamation of religions, and trafficking in persons, especially women and children.

Annex II: Expected Accomplishments

Note: There is no specific reference to persons with disabilities or their rights. However, there are some related issues:

OHCHR has 11 expected accomplishments, as set out in the Strategic Management Plan 2010-2011.

Relating to changes in national protection systems
1. Increased compliance with international human rights standards by all States entities, including national human rights institutions and the Judiciary, as well as with domestic laws, policies and programmes (EA1)

2. Increased ratification of international and regional human rights instruments and review of reservations of international human rights instruments (EA2)

3. Justice and accountability mechanisms established and functioning in accordance with international human rights standards to monitor, investigate and redress civil and political, as well as economic, social and cultural human rights violations (EA3)

4. Increased number of measures taken to improve access of discriminated groups, and particularly women, to justice and basic services (EA4)

5. Right-holders, specially discriminated groups, and particularly women, increasingly use existing national protection systems and participate in decision-making processes and the development and monitoring of public policies (EA5)

Relating to changes in the international protection system or its use
6. Increased compliance and engagement by States with UN human rights mechanisms and bodies (treaty bodies, special procedures, Human Rights Council/Universal Periodic Review - UPR) (EA6)

7. Increased number and diversity of rights-holders and national human rights institutions and civil society actors acting on their behalf making use of UN and regional human rights mechanisms and bodies (EA7)

8. International and regional human rights law and institutions progressively strengthened and/or developed (EA8)

9. Enhanced coherence and consistency of UN human rights mechanisms and bodies (EA9)

Relating to changes in the involvement of other international actors in human rights work
10. International community increasingly responsive to critical human rights situations and issues (EA10)

11. Increased integration of human rights standards and principles, including the right to development, into UN system policies and programmes with respect to development, humanitarian action, peace and security and economic and social issues (EA11)





Annex III: Global Management

Outputs and Monitoring Framework

OHCHR has eight global management outputs, as set out in the Strategic Management Plan 2010-2011.

Output 1: Understanding of OHCHR strategic direction is shared across the Office, with coordination and communication strengthened between management and staff, between HQ and field presences, and among divisions (GMO1)

Output 2: Strategic decisions are made in a timely and transparent manner, and effectively implemented and followed-up (GMO2)

Output 3: Increased effectiveness of OHCHR’s lead role in partnerships for human rights mainstreaming (GMO3)

Output 4: Increased effectiveness in servicing human rights mechanisms and in supporting follow-up to their recommendations (GMO4)

Output 5: Increased effectiveness and efficiency in supporting field operations (GMO5)

Output 6: OHCHR staff have necessary competencies and skills to implement OHCHR global thematic strategies, and to consistently adopt and diligently achieve related targets (GMO6)

Output 7: OHCHR website supports OHCHR’s mission and priorities and meets the needs of users (GMO7)

Output 8: Resource mobilized in a diversified and sustainable way, with flexible use for OHCHR (GMO8)